Garlic And Fluorine Combination Shows Promise as Drug Therapy


Source: University of Albany

Summary: Researchers in a new pilot study hypothesized that adding the chemical element fluorine into natural garlic-derived compounds could prove to be a powerful combination in the development of future drug therapies.


Garlic has more to offer than its strong pungent taste and distinctive odor. For centuries, it has been used as a natural medicine. Previous research found that compounds in garlic serve as a natural antibiotic and help in fighting various diseases and illness. Coming to fluorine, it is one the most reactive elements in the periodic table and extensively used in the pharmaceutical industry – several of the top-selling drugs contain fluorine atoms (for example, Pfizer’s cholesterol-lowering agent Lipitor and Prevacid). Researchers from the University of Albany in a new pilot study hypothesized that adding the chemical element fluorine into natural garlic-derived compounds could prove to be a powerful combination in the development of future drug therapies. The study findings were published in the journal of Molecules.

Garlic and fluorine combination could be the future of drug therapeutics

Could the combination of garlic and fluorine be the future of drug therapeutics? Credit: University at Albany

Due to the great importance of fluorine in medicinal chemistry and chemical biology, researchers were interested in observing the effect that fluorine substitution would have on the chemical reactivity and biological activity of garlic compounds.They tested their hypothesis by modifying several garlic compounds and replacing hydrogen atoms with fluorine atoms. A 10-day old chick embryo eggs were used to check the effectiveness of the fluorine-modified compounds and unmodified compounds as anti-angiogenesis (helps in the fight against cancer by blocking tumor growth) and antithrombotic (helps to reduce the formation of blood clots) agents. Results showed the modified compounds were superior in biological activity and pave away for new drug therapies.

Prof. Eric Block said, “Our results show evidence that new pharmaceuticals can involve modifying naturally-formed garlic compounds to enhance their beneficial biological activity”, “This paper represented a pilot study. Future work requires modifying the laboratory procedures to make the new compounds discovered more readily available, and at a lower cost, to facilitate more detailed laboratory, biological and, potentially, clinical study.”


More Information: Eric Block et al. Fluorinated Analogs of Organosulfur Compounds from Garlic (Allium sativum): Synthesis, Chemistry and Anti-Angiogenesis and Antithrombotic Studies, Molecules (2017). DOI: 10.3390/molecules22122081


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