Fat Cells Seem to Remember Unhealthy Diet


Source: University of Copenhagen

Summary: According to a study, It only takes 24 hours for a so-called precursor fat cell to reprogram its epigenetic recipe for developing into a fat cell. This change occurs when the cell is put into contact with the fatty acid palmitate or the hormone TNF-alpha.


Several epigenetic studies have suggested that human precursor cells have a memory of past environmental exposure. But until now, no one has been able to identify the factors affecting the reprogramming of precursor fat cells or establish the rapidity at which cells are reprogrammed. People are exposed to palmitate through food, especially foods containing large amounts of saturated fat, including dairy products, meat and palm oil. TNF-alpha is an inflammatory hormone that is secreted by the body during illness. Obese patients also have a higher level of TNF-alpha, as obesity is linked to inflammation. Researchers from the University of Copenhagen, in a new study, found that it only takes 24 hours for a so-called precursor fat cell to reprogram its epigenetic recipe for developing into a fat cell. This change occurs when the cell is put into contact with the fatty acid palmitate or the hormone TNF-alpha. The study findings were published in the International Journal of Obesity.

Fat cells tend to recognise unhealthy diet

Credit: University of Copenhagen

The research team collected fat tissue from 43 planned operations. Fifteen patients were lean, 14 were obese and 14 were obese and suffered from type 2 diabetes. By collecting samples from these three groups of patients, the researchers were able to compare the health of the precursor fat cells between them. The team learned that the cells from the group of obese patients suffering from type 2 diabetes had been reprogrammed and therefore did not function like normal, healthy fat cells. By exposing healthy precursor fat cells to the two external factors Palmitate and TNF-alpha for just 24 hours, the researchers were able to mimic the reprogramming they had observed in cells from the diabetic patients. The researchers are unsure whether it is possible to reverse the programming to make the cells healthy and functional again. And even if it is possible, they do not know how to do it.

Romain Barrès, who headed the study said, “Our results stress the importance of a healthy diet and lifestyle for metabolic health. To a large extent, a healthy diet and healthy lifestyle can help prevent the reprogramming of our precursor cells. In the long term, we hope our study may be at the origin of new strategies to reverse the abnormal programming of fat precursor cells, making them healthy and functional once again.”


More Information: Emil Andersen et al, “Preadipocytes from obese humans with type 2 diabetes are epigenetically reprogrammed at genes controlling adipose tissue function, International Journal of Obesity (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41366-018-0031-3


You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *